Last winter, Bev ordered a new window for our house.  It was going to replace the dilapidated aluminum slider that opened to the back yard.  A glass company here in town built the low wall the window rested on and installed the window.

The next stage of the operation was to get a stucco company to finish the exterior wall to match the rest of the house.  The first guy that agreed to do the job only did the first coat, but never came back.  Then a guy named Frank called us and agreed to do the job.

Months went by, and then he showed up one day.  “I’m so sorry,” he said.  “I lost your name and address and just found it this week.”  We were happy he showed up and quite impressed with his politeness.

It took three trips to do the job:  one to examine the wall, one to apply the second coat of plaster, and one to apply the color coat.  I was impressed with the job that was done, and you can’t even see where the new material is.

Frank was the plasterer’s name, and he asked me what I did for a living.  I told him I was a pastor.  He immediately said, “Then write the bill for half of the agreed charge.”  I told him I couldn’t do that.  “The ox is worthy of his hire,” I told Frank.

I went in to write the check, and when I came out he said, “I don’t want you to pay me anything.  Tear up the check.”  I refused and gave him the check saying that I wanted him to feel good about this transaction.  I also said that I was grateful for the good job he had done.

Frank reminds me of what is good in the world.  Here was a very generous man, who was willing to personally bear the costs of repairing the exterior wall of my house.  I came away from the experience feeling very encouraged by his generosity and integrity.

He took the check, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it never clears the bank.  He’s that kind of person.

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