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Apologetics is the practice of defending a position, usually religious, through the use of reason. It is an especially useful practice in our pluralistic society known for its tsunami of ideas.

There are enough apologetical books to fill a room, however, only a few are needed for helping to sort out the questions that surround whether to believe in God or not. Skepticism without complete information is foolish. Faith without skepticism will not stand the fires of examination. The following is a short list of recommended books on the subject of belief.

Mere Christianity, McMillan Books, 1952, by C.S. Lewis is a classic in apologetics. Lewis was on the English faculty at the University of Oxford and a friend of J.R.R. Tolkien, famous for the Lord of the Rings trilogy. Lewis became an atheist at age 15 but later renounced that view and became a Christian. “Mere Christianity” is is a very good place to begin thinking about the validity of faith.

The Reason for God, Dutton Books, 2008, by Timothy Keller takes a look at seven biggest objections and doubts about Christianity, but he does this in a very respectful way. The second half of the book he sets forth the reasons underlying Christian faith. This book is well-written, honorable, and intelligent.

Simply Christian, Harper San Francisco, 2006, by N.T. Wright walks readers through the Christian faith, examining the questions and doubts that people often have about it. “Simply Christian” is very readable and interesting.

The Case for Christ, Harper Collins, 1998, by Lee Strobel is the result of a Chicago Tribune journalist’s examination of the claims made about Christ. Strobel holds a Masters of Studies in Law degree from Yale Law School, and this well qualified him to look at the subject of Christ through the lens of an attorney. In this compelling book, Strobel looks at fourteen pieces of evidence.

Why Christian?, Fortress Press, 1998, by Douglas John Hall is written for “people on the edges.” The book is a fictional conversation between an aging professor of Christian theology and a university undergraduate. The student is a composite of people who Hall knows or has known that have struggled with the matter of faith. Douglas John Hall would consider himself part of that crowd and therefore understands the issues of doubt.

These are just a sampling of the many excellent books available on the subject of faith. Any one of these is a good place to begin.

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